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Tina Kim Gallery

Jeong 井

  • Suki Seokyeong Kang
  • C5f86913 4d89 42b0 86e8 046b9d1a7692

Press for Jeong 井

Current Exhibitions at Tina Kim Gallery


Dwarf, Dust, Doubt

  • Gimhongsok,
  • Opens: Oct. 25, 2018
  • Closes: Nov. 30, 2018
  • Reception: Oct. 25, 2018
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
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Citizen’s Forest

  • Park Chan-Kyong,
  • Opens: Sep. 13, 2018
  • Closes: Oct. 13, 2018
  • Reception: Sep. 13, 2018
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SUMMER GROUP SHOW in partnership with Commonwealth & Council

  • Carolina Caycedo,
  • Beatriz Cortez,
  • Rafa Esparza,
  • Patricia Fernández,
  • EJ Hill,
  • Alice Könitz,
  • Kang Seung Lee,
  • Gala Porras-Kim,
  • Jennifer Moon,
  • Jen Smith,
  • Clarissa Tossin,
  • Opens: Jun. 28, 2018
  • Closes: Aug. 03, 2018
  • Reception: Jun. 28, 2018
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

Conjunction

  • Ha Chong-Hyun,
  • Opens: May. 04, 2018
  • Closes: Jun. 16, 2018
  • Reception: May. 04, 2018
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

Jeong 井

  • Suki Seokyeong Kang
  • Opens: Feb. 28, 2018
  • Closes: Apr. 07, 2018
  • Reception: Feb. 28, 2018
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

Mamour [EXTENDED]

  • Minouk Lim,
  • Opens: Nov. 02, 2017
  • Closes: Jan. 20, 2018
  • Reception: Nov. 02, 2017
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

Wook-Kyung Choi

  • Wook-Kyung Choi,
  • Opens: Sep. 14, 2017
  • Closes: Oct. 28, 2017
  • Reception:
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

Kim Yong-Ik

  • Kim Yong-Ik,
  • Opens: Apr. 27, 2017
  • Closes: Jun. 17, 2017
  • Reception:
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

When

Feb 28 - Apr 07, 2018

  • Reception: Feb 28, 6 - 8pm

Where

Tina Kim Gallery

  • 525 West 21st Street, New York NY 10011 Map
  • 212.716.1100

About

Tina Kim Gallery is pleased to present Jeong 井, a solo exhibition of works by Seoul-based artist Suki Seokyeong Kang. On view from 28 February - 7 April 2018, the exhibition features installations, sculptures and video works that reflect Kang’s study of the traditional Korean musical notation system Jeongganbo (井間譜).



First invented during the Joseon Dynasty (1392 until 1910), Jeongganbo is a method used to notate the pitch and length of time of notes within traditional orchestral music. The notation system is distinctive from the Western method of using staffed paper; in Jeongganbo each note occupies a small square, organized sequentially to connote time. Kang has chosen to use the Chinese character (井) in her title because of its resemblance to this grid system. Kang (b. 1977) has adopted this traditional grid as a foundation of her practice, using it to explore how we form social spaces.



In Jeong 井, Kang presents a series of modules that are a visual translation of Jeongganbo. Using the logic of the grid allows the artist to incorporate other elements including painting, mixed media and found materials and narratives from traditional Korean lyrics. Kang’s practice is organized around this complex and layered research, and her distinctive translation process is used to transform the notational system of traditional music into a spatial choreography. For the artist, each individual square symbolizes the rich tonality and movement of the viewer, all the while maintaining the restraint that defines Jeongganbo. When combined, her modules become a visual system that seeks balance, allowing for the coexistence of each individual square in a greater installation that frames the relationship between artwork and viewer.



Using the architecture of the gallery, Kang has transformed the three spaces to mirror a sequence of Jeongganbo squares. The exhibition comprises numerous mixed media sculptures, including Jeong and Pause and Position – Jeong, as well as the 26-minute video Black Under Colored Moon, which shows actors moving Jeong sculptures and arranging them in an ongoing series of notational arrangements.

Kang has written that, “It is through this structure of logic that I explore the contradictions and conflicts each individual faces in society, and build a structure of condensed harmony. Appropriating this past way of coexistence, I wish to portray the anxiety of the present while also nurturing a hope for the future.”


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