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Senior & Shopmaker Gallery

Eyes Wide Open

  • Saul Steinberg,
  • Philip Guston
  • Fef32ebb 0e1b 4108 fe2f 7daca0b4a682
    Philip Guston,
    1 / 4 All
  • 265de3a7 953b 4389 b4b6 d6954d1c00c9
    Philip Guston,
    2 / 4 All
  • 28ced954 028a 4f10 e4fc 49fd0e2d9b8e
    Saul Steinberg,
    3 / 4 All
  • E9a30ca7 5a80 4ab0 c719 3e85df565d98
    Saul Steinberg,
    4 / 4 All

Press for Eyes Wide Open

Current Exhibitions at Senior & Shopmaker Gallery


Eyes Wide Open

  • Saul Steinberg,
  • Philip Guston
  • Opens: Nov. 02, 2018
  • Closes: Dec. 22, 2018
  • Reception:
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

Spheres Of Influence

  • Al Held,
  • Michael Craig-Martin,
  • Judy Pfaff,
  • Stanley Whitney,
  • Opens: Sep. 13, 2018
  • Closes: Oct. 27, 2018
  • Reception:
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

Arc Paintings

  • Georgia Marsh,
  • Opens: May. 17, 2018
  • Closes: Jul. 20, 2018
  • Reception:
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

Vera Molnar: Drawings 1949-1986

  • Vera Molnar,
  • Opens: Mar. 23, 2018
  • Closes: May. 12, 2018
  • Reception:
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

Recent Prints

  • Vija Celmins,
  • Opens: Feb. 02, 2018
  • Closes: Mar. 17, 2018
  • Reception:
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

Prints and Related Works [Extended]

  • Leon Polk Smith,
  • Opens: Nov. 10, 2017
  • Closes: Jan. 27, 2018
  • Reception:
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

Structures And Fields, Drawings 2011-2017

  • Edda Renouf,
  • Opens: Sep. 13, 2017
  • Closes: Nov. 04, 2017
  • Reception:
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

When

Nov 02 - Dec 22, 2018


Where

Senior & Shopmaker Gallery

  • 210 11th Avenue, 8th Floor, New York NY 10001 Map
  • 212.213.6767

About

Senior & Shopmaker is pleased to present an exhibition of drawings, prints, and objects by Saul Steinberg (1914-1999) and Philip Guston (1913-1980). This expanded exhibition, which originally opened in a smaller format at the IFPDA Fine Art Print Fair, will run through December 22.

Friends for more than two decades, both artists were deeply affected by the social and political turbulence in America in the mid-1960s and 70s, and social commentary, be it veiled or pointed, is prevalent in their work. The modernist theories that provided the underpinnings of abstract painting did not serve their immediate goals of depicting the human condition, and Guston notoriously abandoned its precepts around 1965 in favor of figuration. Each employed cartooning skills in service of their primary artistic aims, exemplified in Guston’s Poor Richard drawings of the early 1970s caricaturing Richard Nixon, and Steinberg’s satirical images of poseurs, figures in social isolation, and American materialism.

Working in collaboration with the The Saul Steinberg Foundation, the exhibition will include never-before-seen unique prints with handwork and collage, in addition to a selection of drawings, painted wood objects, and painted ‘masks’ by the artist. Steinberg, perhaps best known for his work in print in The New Yorker magazine, embraced the medium of drawing early in his career in the 1930s as a cartoonist for Milan-based humor newspapers. Fleeing Fascist Italy during the war, Steinberg arrived in New York in 1942. Imbued with satirical wit, the drawings, which often incorporate collage, reflected the artist’s keen fascination with the architecture and hurly-burly street life of his adopted city. His work of the 1950s, with its roots in humor and popular observation, set the stage for the succeeding generation of Pop artists.

Philip Guston, disenchanted with the making of the gestural Abstract Expressionist paintings that characterize his work of the late 1950s and 1960s, refocused the content of his painting to a highly original figurative style better adapted to his narrative intentions. Guston will be represented at the booth presentation by a selection of black and white figurative lithographs editioned at Gemini G.E.L. shortly before his death in 1980, as well as drawings from the late 1960s. These bold works are inhabited by the artist’s iconographic motifs including books, clocks, severed legs, clenched fists, and the hooded Klansman, a frequent protagonist that first appeared in his work in 1930. Like Steinberg’s masks, the hooded figure is emblematic of the protective disguises individuals, including the artist, use to hide behind as well as their obvious political symbolism.

The exhibition will be accompanied by an illustrated e-catalogue with an essay by Antonia Pocock, Ph.D. candidate in Art History at New York University Institute of Fine Arts. Senior & Shopmaker Gallery is the sole representative of Saul Steinberg’s editioned work from the The Saul Steinberg Foundation.


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