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Fredericks & Freiser

Human Nature [Extended]

  • Lucas Foglia

Press for Human Nature [Extended]

"A Photographer’s Journey Through Our Ever-Weirder Relationship To Nature"

Current Exhibitions at Fredericks & Freiser


4 Artists

  • Felipe Baeza,
  • Jenna Gribbon,
  • Anja Salonen,
  • Vaughn Spann,
  • Opens: Jun. 21, 2018
  • Closes: Jul. 27, 2018
  • Reception: Jun. 21, 2018
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

1001 Nights

  • Zak Smith,
  • Opens: Apr. 19, 2018
  • Closes: Jun. 01, 2018
  • Reception: Apr. 19, 2018
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

He Demon

  • Gary Panter,
  • Opens: Mar. 01, 2018
  • Closes: Apr. 14, 2018
  • Reception: Mar. 01, 2018
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

New Paintings

  • Cristina De Miguel,
  • Opens: Jan. 25, 2018
  • Closes: Feb. 24, 2018
  • Reception: Jan. 25, 2018
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

Human Nature [Extended]

  • Lucas Foglia
  • Opens: Nov. 30, 2017
  • Closes: Jan. 20, 2018
  • Reception: Nov. 30, 2017
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

Carey Smith

  • Carey Smith,
  • Opens: Oct. 19, 2017
  • Closes: Nov. 18, 2017
  • Reception: Oct. 19, 2017
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

Mark Thomas Gibson

  • Mark Thomas Gibson,
  • Opens: Sep. 07, 2017
  • Closes: Oct. 14, 2017
  • Reception: Sep. 07, 2017
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

Four Artists

  • Charlotte De Larminat,
  • Josephine Messer,
  • Cristina De Miguel,
  • Deb Sokolow,
  • Opens: Jul. 06, 2017
  • Closes: Jul. 28, 2017
  • Reception: Jul. 06, 2017
  • Hours: 5 - 7pm
  • Admission: free

Paintings: New And Old

  • Thomas Trosch,
  • Opens: Apr. 20, 2017
  • Closes: Jun. 23, 2017
  • Reception:
  • Hours: 6 - 8pm
  • Admission: free

When

Nov 30 - Jan 20, 2018

  • Reception: Nov 30, 6 - 8pm

Where

Fredericks & Freiser

  • 536 West 24th Street, New York NY 10011 Map
  • 212.633.6555

About

Lucas Foglia’s newest series of photographs, “Human Nature,” deftly navigates this strange conceptual territory, where nature is both a quenching oasis and a shimmering mirage. Foglia is an uncommonly sincere, even earnest, person—a farm boy raised by back-to-the-landers, he freely shares his work with advocacy groups, and he told me that “it’s important for me to release the book now, because many of the scientists included in the book are facing budget cuts and censorship by the Trump Administration.” And yet his artistic sensibility is sly. Many of the images one would expect to see in a photo series inspired by the ravages of climate change are absent: there are no indigenous tribespeople staring blankly out over clear-cuts; no rhinos shorn of their horns (in fact, no non-human megafauna of any kind, aside from a single stuffed elk standing, eerily, in the halls of an office building); no flooded streets or flattened palm trees or giant storm clouds looming over coastal cities like evil stepdads. Instead, there are photographs that, at first, appear familiar and then reveal an unsettling irony: a logger kneels before a tree, the chainsaw poised against its trunk, as he gazes upward at it with hushed reverence; a massive Alaskan glacier, melting into chalkboard-green water, looks delicate and tiny, like the shards of a dropped porcelain vase; a girl wades serenely through a pond full of invasive water lilies; the wall of a grimy slaughterhouse in Los Angeles is painted with a cartoonishly cheerful scene of farm life; a McDonald’s in Singapore sprouts a green roof. (When Foglia was completing his master’s degree, at Yale, a teacher, Gregory Crewdson, surveyed his photos and drily remarked, “Lucas, I see you are using humor.”)


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"A Photographer’s Journey Through Our Ever-Weirder Relationship To Nature"

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